Impacts

 

PLEASE SELECT AN ACTIVITY

Impacts 1 (Lower KS3)

Students will begin by looking at the idea that planets such are our own Earth, are impacted (hit) by objects from space. This is done by using the student worksheet or via a class discussion (or both!!). Students will then work through the activity sheet. They will need to solve equations, think logically about the impacting process, answer questions and draw conclusions. The exercise can be concluded with another class discussion to see how initial opinions have changed after working through the activity.

 

Impacts 2 (Higher KS3)

Students will begin by looking at the idea that planets such are our own Earth, are impacted (hit) by objects from space. This is done by using the student worksheet or via a class discussion (or both!!). Students will then work through the activity sheet. They will need to solve equations (of a higher level than Impacts 1), think logically about the impacting process and issues such as gravity and air pressure, answer questions and draw conclusions. The exercise can be concluded with another class discussion to see how initial opinions have changed after working through the activity.

 

Impacts 3 (Lower KS4)

Students will begin by looking at the idea that planets such are our own Earth, are impacted (hit) by objects from space using the student worksheet. The worksheet encourages students to think about how the density and incoming angle of the meteorite, along with the gravitational pull and surface pressure of the planet, effect whether or not the meteorite will actually land on the planet. Students will then work through the activity sheet. They will need to solve equations, think logically about the impacting process, answer questions and draw conclusions. The exercise can be concluded with a class discussion to see how initial opinions have changed after working through the activity.

 

Impacts 4 (Higher KS4)

Students will begin by looking at the idea that planets such are our own Earth, are impacted (hit) by objects from space using the student worksheet. The worksheet encourages students to think about how the density and incoming angle of the meteorite, along with the gravitational pull and surface pressure of the planet, effect whether or not the meteorite will actually land on the planet. Students will then work through the activity sheet.
They will need to analyse data, think logically about the impacting process and establish relationships between variables and deduce an equation to find the minimum diameter of a meteorite that can land on a planet. The exercise can be concluded with a class discussion to see if everyone has deduced the same equation, and how initial opinions have changed after working through the activity.

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